Skip to main content

Full text of "X Collection 314B"



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page: 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



nun iiiii inn ii 




M:SI«!lli:i 111 II I M 




020 534 913 3 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 
Iiiii ■■!!!■■!■ IMM" 11 " urn mi. mi i H i 



020 534 914 5 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



:T. U lim 




i iiiii him mil iiiii mi; nii in hi: hi 



020 534 915 7 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



IIIII IIIII IIIII IIIII III 




ii 1 Ml | III 



020 534 916 9 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

ill!! iiii! I!! ! !!■" ■"" '"" " ' "'" ""' IIIN " ' 



IIIII Ulllllll 
020 534 917 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

iii I ii! I iSi ! mi!! I! ■ !!!!■ '"" "■" " l " ""i '"' , ,l|) " 




020 534 918 2 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

Hill IIIII IIIII IIIII IIIII llll 





020 534 919 4 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

!!!!!;!!] !!!'! '!"!!" " < 1111111111111 11 1 




020 534 920 



Box Number 



310 



311 



31?- 



5/3 



31 HA 



311 B 



Total of 
Volumes 



loO 



Call Number 



t>0 \U2. vu>*, Q-\-5b 



41 



3 1 ) 



D</22*- DV3&,0 






DlW)UiO^-/W) 



ZH 



VUHU'VUHl-L, 



iS 



% 






3&Pt\ l l 



*r 






y?6 



Hh 



/Atr, V-^5" 






X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:. 



2 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

!!■! ! ■■!!! !!! I ill"!! 111 "'" '"" "■" "'" " ,|: ""■ "" "" 





020 534 921 2 



Vw 



Box Number 



3\io 






Total of 
Volumes 



£2- 



Call Number 







X-DU 420 



/{$ #(cb 



Currie's 



C 




NEW ZEALAND 

AND THE 

STATUTE OF WESTMINSTER 

1931 









t 



L 





X- D U 420 


«fD 


Mi 










Epic 

18 

b 

G. H. SCH 

19 


Year 

93 

y 

OLEFIELD 
46 




, 




. 



Star Print, Duncdin. 




c 







' 



X-DU 420 






#6^ 



Zhe ©r&ev of Confirmation 



Authorised for use in the 

Diocese of Huchlano. 




HYMN. 

The Hymn being ended (the Candidates and Congregation 
still standing), the Vicar shall say: 

Eeverend Father in God, I present unto you these persons to 
receive from you the Laying on of hands. 

(List of Candidates handed to Bishop.) 

Bishop: Take heed that the persons whom you present unto 
us be prepared in heart and mind to receive the grace of Confirma- 
tion. . • 

Vicar: I have enquired of them, and think them so to be. 

Bishop: Let the Preface be read. 

PEEFACE. 

(Read by the Vicar.) 

To the end that Confirmation may be ministered to the more 
edifying of such as shall receive it, the Church hath thought good 
to order, That none hereafter shall be Confirmed, but such as can 
say the Creed, the Lord's Prayer, and the Ten Commandments; 
and can also answer to such other Questions, as in the short Cate- 
chism are contained : which order is very convenient to be observed ; 
to the end, that children, being now come to the years of discretion, 
and having learned what their Godfathers and Godmothers promised 
for them in Baptism, they may themselves, with their own mouth 
and consent, openly before the Church, ratify and confirm the same ; 
and also promise, that by the grace of God they will evermore en- 
deavour themselves faithfully to observe such things, aa they, by 
their own confession, have assented unto. 

Candidates and Congregation sit. 

The Bishop gives a preliminary address to the Candidates, at 
the conclusion of which the Candidates (only) stand. 



L 



. 



J 



c 



c 



X-DU 420 



L$~ 



#10 



tb 



PAROCHIAL DISTRICT OF KAIKOURA 



Bt iter's Church 



D 



IAMOND UBILEE 



j' 



1874--1934 



With an Introduction 

"OLD KAIKOURA IN OUTLINE" 

(By E. J. Watts, M.A.) 
PRICE: ONE SHILLING 



L 



y 



I 



X-DU 420 



/33 ^7/H 



Mar=®ime &cttbitieg 

of tije 

Cfjurcf) of Cnglanb in JJeto Healanb. 



In the CAMPS throughout the Dominion 
J and OVERSEAS with, the Troops 

a Vitally Necessary Work 
is being Done. 



I OUR LADS and MEN, ABSENT from THEIR HOMES, 
k need all the Spiritual Support we can give 

them in their Army life. 



Issued by direction of the Military Affairs Committee of the 

Church of England, under the authority of the Bishops of the Province. 

Headquarters: 527 D.I.C. Building, Wellington, C.i. 



1 

> 

1 

> 


i 


> 


• 

i 

a. •••••••••••••"•-•■■•"^ 


t 

> 




• 






OUR HUT AT PAPAKURA 



Church Army Press. 90 Rehmond Rd.. Auckland. W.l. 



/ 



* 




X-DU 420 
#1 



% &r £13l 



\ 



The Dominion Federated 
Sawmillers' Association 



(INCORPORATED). 



EVIDENCE IN SUPPORT OF APPLICATION FOR INVESTI- 
GATION INTO THE CUSTOMS TARIFF ON IMPORTED 
TIMBER GIVEN BEFORE THE TARIFF INVESTIGATION 
COMMISSION AT CHRISTCHURCH ON 23rd APRIL, 1921. 



1.— The Necessity of Protecting the Timber Industry 



" 



- ^corvine of the highest 

c_„ f 




on 



L 



/ 




X-DU 420 



1$ 



rsr jtlz 



•! 
I 

j 

sol 



The Dominion Federated 
Sawmillers' Association 



(INCORPORATED). 



EVIDENCE IN SUPPORT OF APPLICATION FOR INVESTI- 
GATION INTO THE CUSTOMS TARIFF ON IMPORTED 
TIMBER GIVEN BEFORE THE TARIFF INVESTIGATION 
COMMISSION AT CHRISTCHURCH ON 23rd APRIL, 1921. 



1 — The Necessity of Protecting the Timber Industry. 

That the timber industry is deserving of the highest 
measure of protection possible is evidenced by the fact 
that it stands second in the list of manufactories as re- 
gards number of employees (see 1920 "Year Book," 
page 277), the total number employed for year ending 
31st March, 1920, being (with sash and door factories) 
7,265, of whom 7,203 are males. Taking into considera- 
tion the dependents of these men it thus is evident that 
the timber industry supports a very large number of our 
population. It actually accounted during 1918-1919 for 
8.7 per cent, of the total employees engaged in all indus- 
tries and 1 1 .24 per cent, of the total males employed. The 
total of wages paid in the timber industry during 1918- 
1919 was £1,062,985 (or only £221,358 less than the 
freezing industry which stands highest on the list), 
accounting for 13.21 per cent, of the total wages paid in 
all listed industries during that year; for 1919-1920 the 
total of wages paid was £1,421,867. Against these 
figures the total value of the produce of the industry is 
given as £2,329,535, or only 4.1 per cent, of the total 
value of products of all industries in 1918-1919, and for 
1919-1920 the sawn timber produced was valued at 
£2,181,805, which means that in the timber industry 
wages accounts for a greater proportion of the value of 
the product than in any other industry, the actual figure 
for 1919-1920 being 61 per cent. Every £100 paid in 
productive wages during 1918-1919 in the timber indus- 
try produced only £247 in value of product, so that in 




/ 



L 






~0 ^ 



a 

[Reprinted from the Selwyn College Calendar, 1908- 1909] IL 



X-DU 420 



1 

! 




SOME MEMORIALS 

OF 

BISHOP G. A. SELWYN 

AND 

% BISHOP PATTESON 

BY 

The Rev. J. H. SRAWLEY, D.D. 

TUTOR AND LIBRARIAN OF SELWYN COLLEGE 



* * 







/ 



L 



L 



j 



■ z 1 



THE HISTORY 

OF THE 

PARISH 

OF 
OTAIO AND 

BLUE CLIFFS 



• 




X-DU 420 
*1 



ST. JOHN'S 
CHURCH, 

MILTON 



is-p 



Jhs 



I 



C 




1 



.. 



75th Anniversary of 
the Dedication of 
the Church by 
Bishop Selwyn 



L 



-- ':- 



— - s 




i 



X- D U 420 



*)Lo i 



*7b 



L 



From the Writings of 



&amwl ixtx&aiWj 



f Born 27th April, 1776 
Died nth July, 1832 



Transcribed by John William Forsaith 

in May, 1943, from the original 

document in his possession 




\ 



c 



- ' 


x-du42o j ^77 


* 
» 

1 


L -f— ■ 

The Problem of 
Mental Deficiency 






in New Zealand 




I ■ 

i 


By 

' NINA A. R. BARRER, MA. 




• 

• 
• 


Published by the Women's Division 
:: of New Zealand Farmers' Union :: 




_^ , —. — 


—A 



L 



- 



.u 



Cji 






J=1S 



C 



I 



Second Petition 



or 



F. G. DALZIELL 



TO 



The Parliament of New Zealand 



I 



To be presented at its 1 925 Session. 



PRAYING that a Royal Commission or other 

authoritative tribunal may be set up to sift what men in 

New Zealand really KNOW about the constitution of life 

from what they merely BELIEVE about it. 



mi» 2IAIAX0 TIUII, Mlltr, 




f 






$m 



AN OPEN LETTER 

TO THE 
EDITOR OF "TRUTH" 




by ARTHUR SEWELL 








X-DU 420 RECONSTRUCTION SERIES NO. I 

,Z 1 _ 



dW 



A GENERAL SURVEY OF 



PROBLEMS OF 
RECONSTRUCTION 




H. BELSHAW 



srypevice 



r 





c 



iss §? n 

Public as ; M "Work, 

AND HOW IT IS DISPOSED OF. 

The following Correspondence will illustrate this 
important subject :— 

First Letter from Mr. Field to Colonel Balneavis. 

Printing Office, "VVelleslev St. East, Auckland, 
July 11, 1871. 

Sin, — A month or two ago I called at your office, and requested that a chance 
of obtaining the printing of the Franchise Rolls should be given to me in com- 
mon with the other Printers of Auckland. I expressed my willingness to 
tender, or compete for them in any other equitable manner. (Public work 
ought to be given out in this way.) On this occasion I was informed that the 
Rolls would not be printed till about October next. 

To day I again called at your office to enquire about this work, and I need 
scarcely say I was astonished to find it had all been arranged for with other 
Printers, though I had not been communicated with on the subject. This does 
not look well, and I fear there has been unfair dealing of which you ought to 
be informed. 

I was, indeed, told that, because I gave my portion of the Roll work out to 
another office last year, I could not get a chance of competing this time ; but 
is this reasonable ? The work was given out by me because I had an extra 
pressure of business at that time, and it was executed satisfactorily. And, I 
need scarcely say, it is no uncommon occurrence for one office to get work done 
in another. I have done work myself in this way. The " Cross" has been 
printed in the " Herald" office, and the " Herald" in the " Cross" office under 
circumstances, and lately, when there was a break down of machinery, the 
"Evening Neics" was printed away from its usual office. No, this circumstance 
argues nothing in the matter ; I have the necessary type and machinery for 
printing the Rolls as well as they can be printed in Auckland : 1 requested to 
be allowed to compete with the other Printers for the work, and was not ap- 
plied to when they were applied to, and I can only say it does not look well 
when public work is treated in this way. 

An explanation will much oblige yours, &c, J. H. FIELD. 

Col. Balnkavis. 

Mr. Field's Second Letter to Colonel Balneavis. 

Printing Office, Wellesley St. East, Auckland, 
July 19, 1871. 
Sih, — It is now a week since I posted the letter to you of which the enclosed 
is a copy, and, up to the present, I have had no reply. Your silence will not 
cause me to cease enquiry in a case like this. I fear there has been corrupt 
influence somewhere, and I can assure you I will spare no pains to sift the 
matter thoroughly. 

I again ask for an explanation, and am yours, &c, J. H. FIELD. 
Col. Balneavis. 

Fisuj, Printer, Wellepley Street, East, Auckland. 



c 



<w 






4s^ 



"<iitmi!iiiiii i Mm tut nun 



Landmarks in 
the History of 
New Zealand 
Labour Politics 



By J. T. PAUL 



KmHHWKmmm 



c 







• X-DU 420 

IS & 



n * 



To the Householder 

Postage Paid 
Motueka Electorate 



^ffO^J 




New Zealand 

wrecked ? 



a message to— 

S. G. Holland, M.P. 

Leader of the Opposition. 

from— 

M. Moohan 

National Secretary of the N.Z. 
Labour Party. 

With the Compliments of Hon C. F. Skinner 




r 



X- D U 420 
.2? 



Srot SSH 

- - ■ -" 1 



c 



LETTE1 



which 
every 

New Zealapder 

should 
read 



Price 6d. 



FOREWORD 

The contents of this booklet constitute the most im- 
portant political document of recent times, and should 
be studied and understood by every person in New Zea- 
land. 

When it is realised that one of the worst crimes 
that can be perpetrated on a nation is that of broken 
political promises the importance of the document is 
stressed. 

The reader is asked to draw his own conclusions as 
to authorship. 

A. B. PARKER, 

Kingston St., Auckland, 

C/o. G.P.O., Box 289. 



Printed at the Gem Press, 11 Day St., Newton, for A. B. Parker, G.P.O. Box 28 




1843= 




WAIMEA WEST, 

NELSON, NEW ZEALAND. 



A CENTURY 

OF 

CHRISTIAN 
WITNESS 





DECEMBER 
1843. 



DECEMBER 
1943. 



B. Lucas & Son (Netaon Mall) UA. 



1843= 



=1943 



«- 



t 



I 






^6 



NEW ZEALANDERS 
IN MUFTI 

1914-1918 



BY 



I. W. RAYMOND 

Late Chairman of the 

New Zealand War Contingent Association and 
New Zealand Red Cross Society (London Branch) 




AKQUs 1'rimini, C'OMPAKY. Lru.. 10 Temple Avenue. KC. 4.— 9125 



r; 






^/^ 7 



THE GKEAT SCHEME 



CO-OPEKATIVE COLONIZATION. 



AN INTERVIEW WITH 

ME. W. L. EEES 



Reprinted by authority from "Capital anil Colonisation." 



LONDON : 
5, WESTMINSTER CHAMBERS, VICTORIA STREET, S.W. 




e 



Christian Beginnings 
in Wellington 



X-DU 420 







6 .xO> 



d 






xN 



& 



o^.O^ 



The Story behind the 

Monument and 
Drinking Fountain 

IN THE MANNERS STREET RESERVE 



C 



of Ijlew y£ea[cma 



£LITERATURg 




SOCIETY 



c 




■ 






X- D U 420 



/?v 




/ 



Tokomairiro 
Presbyterian 
Church 



•• •• 
•• •• 



Milton, N.2. 




75th Anniversary 

souvenir 



c 



k 



1854 - 1929 



.- ****** ■ ( ■*<! 







L 



X- 


DU 420 


Hon. 


. 7.4 


Sir 




Thomas 




Kay 




Sidey 




A 




Record 




of 




Public 




Service 




1863-1933 





>~7«" 



d<lO 



C 




i 



X-DU 420 



jll 




THIETY YEARS AGO. 

The following account of the First Meeting of the General Assembly 
of New Zealand was given at a Public Meeting in Dunedin, by the 
Hon. Captain Bellairs, M.L.O., on the 27th December, 1854 : — 
Me. Chaibman and Gbntlemen, — ' 

Some explanation may, I believe, be expected from me in regard 
to my appearing before you this evening to give an account of my 
political cruise to the metropolis of New Zealand. A few of my 
friends have called the propiiety of the proceeding in question. It 
may, therefore, be well that I should state the reasons they urge for 
maintaining that opinion, and the causes that appear to me to war- 
rant my not following their advice. I will first, with your permission, 
glance at the position in which I was placed by my opinions respect- 
ing second Chambers, at the time of my unexpectedly receiving the 
patent of appointment to the Upper House of the first Parliament of 
New Zealand. 

It is notorious that, for many years past, I have advocated the 
advisability of both Chambers of the Constitutional Legislature being 
elective. Apart from detail, I have long been convinced that some 
sort of elective process for the Second or Upper Chamber would be 
the best means of obtaining a really popular and Conservative body, 
to act as a check upon hasty legislation, and avert the immense mis- 
chief which has invariably, from time to time, arisen in countries 
where one Tribunal has alone had the power of acting during periods 
of popular excitement and delusion. 

Anglo-Saxons* however, do not require argument in favor or 
defence of two Chambers. It is a part of their political creed to 
believe in them. They may, and do, differ as to the manner in which 
the revising House should be composed; but they never doubt the 
propriety of establishing some sort of dignified body who should 
calmly examine the proposals of the First Chamber. You may see 
this exemplified in their proceedings in the New World of America. 

It has been my lot to meet great numbers of political characters 
from the States, men of all shades of opinion ; but I never heard the 
Senate or Upper House of the United States spoken of except in 
terms of the highest praise. One, and all — Whigs, Democrats, Loco- 
focoa ; all agree that the Senate has, over and over again, since the 







COPYRIGHT. 



*. 'J 420 

■■:.**" 





Sir 3o»pl) Ward, 

Premier of New Zealand. 



priee t>i*penee. 



^■■IMHMM* 




L 




C 



X-DU 42U 

.1, 



b or..; o:' . 

■ l .c -uts ....... 




THE DOWNFALL OF 



. 




BOTTQMLEY 



J 




HIS LATEST AND GREATEST SWINDLE. 



How he gulled POOR Subscribers to invest One-Pound Notes 

in his 
"GREAT VICTORY WAR BOND CLUB." 




L 



During the Armistice of 1913-19, whilst the country was 
->verjoyod at tha defeat of tlte Germans, tag Govemraont 
required money to carry on, and so they launched their Great 
Victory War Bond Appeal. The wholo country was at the 
highest pitch of excitement. Posters and newspapers were 
jlw-olr.,, bi0...doiAi. ;a thoir lu.r b ^t tj L :.-> > -■ — ■ -.> ■ • •*. 

Bonds." But the price of a single Bond was £85 (per £100), 
repayable a number of years hence, with an Annual " Draw " 
for a Prize of £1 ">. Under our hypocritical system, this was aa 
far us the " Nonconformist Conscience " would allow the 
Government to go. Premium Bonds were suggested, ttnd 
people generally were led to believe by the Press that the=e 
•rould be adopted. But, alas, the Government was not wicked 
enough for that ! But that arch-rogue, the Editor of that 
scurrilous paper called John Bull, saw his chance, and took it, too. 
He at once ordered thousands of circulars and paid huge sums 
tor glaring advertisements in the Sunday papers, informing the 
country at lar^-e of a great Scheme he had devised, for the 
beneat of whom ? — the poor little investor. Bottomley stated 
that, to anyone willing to assist his Country by subscribing the 
widow's mite, one John Bradbury, his scheme would give, first 
of all, security /or their money, and, further, what they required 
and desired, a chance to win a huge 6um in a ballot for the interest 
which would accrue during the noxt twelve months on the 
total amount subscribed. Hundreds of thousands of pounds 
■were received by post in answer to this appeal and hundreds 
of people applied personally at 20, King Street. St. James's, 
which, be it noted, is a palatial residence built in the time of 
Henry VIII., and now furnished with all the splendour usually 
associated with a multi-millionaire or a reigning princj, and 
here also is installed the "John Bull Bank.' The sight of 
all this splendour naturally gave to the poor investor a fi eling 
of confidence and security, and the working man thereupon 
landed over his hard-earned cash, and the widow her little 
hoard, thinking they would be helping their country when 
her need « I : in I lay of victory and living in hi 

rtate of hope and expectancy created by Bottomley'a Scheme. 
• Suppose I am lucky enough to draw a big Prize ? " What 
a hope to spring up in a .. >' •.-.'-. brei I ' " Suppose I won 
five thousand pounds ! I could live : n comfort, and 
irmie of rnv pleasure with tla-. [ lovi What a great and 

sood man is Vr. Bottomley, ented 



a method, in spite of the law, in spite of the Government, 
by Widen a poor investor, who is not satisfied with los. 6d. 
War Savings Certificates, may have a chance in this grand 
and glorious scheme." And Horatio Bottomley became the 
possessor of nearly one million pounds of the poorer people's 

—tj , .WLil :..J U <l t -U.t bO' " ■ L - ruttJ H.ld . !'..Oi! bllti llll«3ru«u« 

of the widow and demobilised soldier. Money is a groat 
temptation to seine people to have possession of. But to 
Bottomley it is, and always has been, that possession is ninety- 
nine points. He knows the great art of spoofing and wriggling ; 
h;s record shows that. These things were said and done in 
1910. Now we are in 1921. and let us see that has happened. 
Let us do as Mr. Bottomley, M.P., saws and does : " WHAT 
A SHORT MEMORY THE POOR FOOLS OF THIS COUNTRY 
HAVE." And those who have given Mr. Bottomley their £1 
notes, and have only got in exchange a piece of common blue 
paper, have got short memories, too I have one of these " soraps 
of paper " before me as I write. On it is printed : " Victory 
Bond Club, 2o, King Street, St. James's. Certificate of 

Membership. This is to certify that the bearer is the holder 
of One Share of One Pound in the above Club, and entitled 
to one chance in the Annual Prize Drawing. (Signed) HonAIlO 
Bottomlf.y, June, 1919." 

The British Government has allowed one of the greatest 
Crooks ever bom of woman to issue as One Pound Shares nearly 
one million of these pieces of common blue paper, thus permitting 
this Editor of a well-known weekly paper to assume the right 
to hold this huge sum alone, with no iru^teis, vo avdilors, and a 
secretary only in name, with no one to say yea or nay if he cares 
to draw Ten Thousand Pounds to have a flutter at Ostend. on 
his horso Aynsley, or on the roulette table in the Casino. Fellow 
Englishman, what ha-, e the power.? of law and or I r b< en reduced 
to when this man, whose record reeks \; ith frauC and immcrahtiee, 
can openly l-u11 the British Public and the For.- re that be with 
this huge bluff; robbing the working man and widow of their 
hard-earned .-■.vines, whilst . not a single English 

gentleman who writes "M.P. " after Lis name game et r'tfh 

• : '.hose who cannot help themselves 

I . ng "? jnstic this en ked M.P. Reader, .his 

is not of thi 'I write, il e present >md furun 

a' ,-ou know of or-v man ' • it«.d eo\ L»go 




> 



X-DU ^20 



$*JO 



JW5~ 



UNION 



or 



L 



ANARCHY ? 



Should the Democratic 
Nations form a Federal 
Union, as proposed in 
CLARENCE K. STREIT'S 
book: 

"UNION NOW" 





•i 







*H 



zfato 



AN 



IMPORTANT 

ANNOUNCEMENT 





BY THE 



A.M.P. SOCIETY 

NEW ZEALAND BRANCH 






The Making of 
Good Citizens 



c 




L 



C 



X-DU 420 



r 



Masterton-Waipukurau 
Railway. 



LENGTH OF PROPOSED LINE ABOUT 
85 MILES. 



Estimated Cost, £1,000,000. 
A Good Business Proposition. 



STUDY THE MAP. 



Issued by the " Wairarapa Daily Times," MASTERTON. 



V ^. 




X-DU 420 
.1 1 






THE PRICE 



CITIZENSHIP 








< 



L 



C 



X-0U420 .£/00 

if ** 4 



! i" 



JUNIOR 



FOUR LESSONS 

ON 

POLYNESIA 



BY 
Revd. and Mr.. W. J. HANDS 



N.Z. ANGLICAN BOARD OF MISSIONS Pwi/.^ Crl 

WELLINGTON. * IlCe OU 



- 



f 



SENIOR 



- 



^> 






^* 



. 



FOUR LESSONS 



ON 



POLYNESIA 






BY 



Revd. W. J. and Mr«. HANDS 



c 



N.Z ANGLICAN BOARD OF MISSIONS 
WELLINGTON. 






Price 5d 



»- j 




' 






U 




z^IGSl 



SPEAKING CANDIDLY 
INDEED 




AN OPEN LETTER TO 

GORDON MIRAMS 



BY 



BERTIE HEYMANN 



FOREWORD BY JACK MELTZER 



! 




Published by Hie Public Relations Committee of the Council of Wellington Jewry. 





THE 




X-OU 420 



DIAMOND 




J 



JUBILEE 



OF THE 





OTAHUHU 
BOROUGH 
COUNCIL 




raph by courtesy of N.Z. Xewi-papeni Ltd. 



I 

X-DU420 ^Oi 

•M ! 

A UNITING IDEOLOGY 



L 






" € FOR 

DEMOCRACY 







"THE FORGOTTEN FACTOR" 

IN NEW ZEALAND 

| v v f